Lawyer: Victim 2, Matt Sandusky settlements against Penn State in ‘final stages’

mdawson@centredaily.com August 19, 2013 

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Matt Sandusky, adopted son of Jerry Sandusky, leaves the courthouse Wednesday, June 20, 2012, following the closing arguments of Jerry Sandusky's sexual abuse trial, at the Centre County Courthouse, in Bellefonte, Pa.

NABIL K. MARK — CDT file photo Buy Photo

— Seven men are in the “final stages” of settling with Penn State their claims of abuse by Jerry Sandusky, including the young man known as Victim 2 and the former coach’s adopted son, their lawyer said Monday.

State College attorney Andrew Shubin said his clients and Penn State had “come to an agreement in principle related to the seven claims,” but he could not discuss specifics. He expected the finalization to happen quickly.

Penn State spokesman David La Torre said the university has made progress on multiple settlements, but he declined to comment further.

Shubin and fellow local lawyer Justine Andronici represented three young men who testified at Sandusky’s trial last year — Victim Nos. 3, 7 and 10.

They’ve also represented the young man known in the grand jury presentment as Victim 2, who, in 2001, was seen in a shower with Sandusky. The witness, Mike McQueary, has testified at three public court hearings that he was sure Sandusky was abusing the boy because of slapping sounds and the proximity of Sandusky’s body to the boy’s.

Shubin and Andronici represent Matt Sandusky, whom Jerry Sandusky adopted at age 17 and who went to police in the middle of the trial and said he had been molested by his adoptive father. Matt Sandusky has distanced himself from his adoptive father even further by filing court paperwork to change his last name. The case is sealed.

In addition to Victims 2, 3, 7 and 10 and Matt Sandusky, the two local lawyers represent two other men claiming they were abused by the former defensive coach.

Penn State authorized $60 million in settlements last month with about 30 Sandusky abuse claimants.

A Philadelphia lawyer said over the weekend that his client, Victim 5 from the Sandusky criminal case, had settled his claims. The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that Kline said the settlement was worth several million dollars.

Kline’s client testified last summer that he’d worked out with Sandusky and then was prodded into a shower. The shower episode happened in August 2001, five months after the now-infamous incident involving Sandusky and Victim 2, which contributed to the firing of head football coach Joe Paterno in 2011 and three senior Penn State administrators being accused of covering up the allegations.

Kline’s client is being reported as the first finalized settlement, but a man from Elizabethtown who was represented by Harrisburg lawyer Ben Andreozzi may have settled, according to news reports. The settlement was referenced in a letter to a judge in Lancaster County as part of the man’s robbery case.

One of the young men who testified at the trial has pursued a civil case. Victim 6, as he’s known in the criminal case, sued Penn State, The Second Mile and Sandusky in federal court for damages related to Sandusky showering with him in a Penn State locker room in 1998. The case was investigated, but Centre County’s district attorney at the time, Ray Gricar, chose not to prosecute the case.

Shubin said his clients, some of whom testified to varying degrees of abuse, are “all in different stages of recovery.”

“This hopefully will help to gain more traction with their recovery,” he said.

Sandusky is serving a minimum 30-year sentence in the state prison in Greene County. Judges from the state’s Superior Court will hear his appeal next month in Luzerne County.

Mike Dawson can be reached at 231-4616. Follow him on Twitter @MikeDawsonCDT.

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