The Cid covers alt-rock bases in quest to reignite music scene

For the CDTSeptember 20, 2013 

The Cid is, from left, Emidio Krupa, Eddie Parry, Graham Harwood and Johnny Marsh.

PHOTO PROVIDED

Newbie local band the Cid is heating up the creative art scene in central Pennsylvania, and with their original songs, musical talent and family-like cameraderie, they hope to reignite the new music scene in Happy Valley.

The Cid is a mostly original concoction, forming last year when friends Johnny Marsh, Emidio Krupa and Eddie Parry came together for a jam session. The fellas knew they were onto something swell, but the lack of a reliable drummer held them back. Six months ago, the three found their missing link in Graham Harwood, who picked up the drum sticks with vigilance and captained the drummer’s stool. Since then they have been playing regularly around town.

The bandmates share lead-singing duties and write most of their songs together. They could be thought of as a classic-rock band with modern pop-song sensibilities for fans of REM, Cracker, NOFX, Weezer and Ween.

“It sort of all came together from the gate,” Harwood said. “Since then, we have kept very busy and been having a lot of fun, and so far it’s been extremely rewarding.”

The boys even moved into a rented house together in a Monkeys-like fashion.

“Living with my bandmates has always been a bit of a dream of mine. Now we can rock day and night,” Marsh said.

It’s easy to see The Cid has a love for video games, as the band’s name is derived from recurring character from the “Final Fantasy” game series. One song by Krupa, “Another Castle,” is a tribute to Mario Bros. referring to the repeated message: “Thank you for saving me, but the princess is being held in another castle.”

While already maintaining an impressive cover library of more than 40 alternative- and college-rock songs, it is not their intention to become another cover band, but a man needs to work. Armed with at least 12 originals, The Cid plans to start recording their debut album this fall for indie label Appalachia Burning Records also home to local semi-regular performers Chris Stanley and the Vipond Street Band and The Nick Miller Project.

“I was more than thrilled to pick up The Cid after fortunately catching their first show,” said label founder and organic farmer Erik Stewart. “The sudden connection I felt with these guys about music was amazing. In a town discouragingly filled to the brim with cover bands, it is extremely refreshing to hear original music that sounded like a instant hit.”

Centre Daily Times is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service