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Discovery Space offers visitors hands-on ‘Make-uary’ fun

Julian Trimmer, 5, of Altoona, bounces the ‘Galaxy Goo’ he made at The Discovery Space in State College on Sunday, Dec. 28, 2014.
Julian Trimmer, 5, of Altoona, bounces the ‘Galaxy Goo’ he made at The Discovery Space in State College on Sunday, Dec. 28, 2014. CDT photo

Making a batch of “Galaxy Goo” can be pretty messy.

“Mommy, wash your hands,” Elise Trimmer, 2, said to her mother, Natalie, after handling a batch Sunday afternoon.

Although it sounds extraterrestrial, the slimy substance can be produced with household items. Making the goo was the activity planned for the first weekend of series of events called “Make-uary,” a series of activities to be held throughout January and February at The Discovery Space in downtown State College, with the objective of engaging both parents and children in making things in both a fun and educational way.

It was the first time at The Discovery Space for the Trimmers, of Altoona. They made the trip after reading about it online, Natalie said.

Their son Julian, 5, is interested in science and got a chemistry kit for Christmas, she said. He had previously tried to make the goo at home. The attempt at The Discovery Space was more successful. It took only five minutes to make, Julian said, and he plans on playing with it some more when he gets home.

Volunteers Emily Sivak and Kelly Harrington, both of State College, helped attendees in making the substance. All that is needed to produce the goo is glue, water, Borax detergent, cups to hold the ingredients, something to stir it and optional food dye, Sivak said. The glue is first mixed with hot water and the food coloring. The Borax and hot water is mixed separately. Both are combined and then stirred until taking a more solid form.

Once finished, it can be formed, molded and even bounced. Julian bounced the blue goo ball off the ground, rolled it across a table and tossed it to his father, Derek, afterwards.

Such events will be held Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays until the end of February and will feature a different activity each week, Sivak said. Attendees next week can make a balloon powered car using items like cardboard and straw.

About 20 children made goo Sunday at The Discovery Space, volunteers said, with some repeat visits.

“We had one kid go through three times,” Harrington said.

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