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Boy helps raise funds for Centre County beagle rescue group

Nate Kopp, right, and his friend Arnav Shanbag sit with beagles from Beagle 911, a local refuge and rescue shelter. Nate spearheaded a fundraiser for Beagle 911 to help provide medical care for the dogs. A check will be presented to the organization at Thursday night’s Spikes game.
Nate Kopp, right, and his friend Arnav Shanbag sit with beagles from Beagle 911, a local refuge and rescue shelter. Nate spearheaded a fundraiser for Beagle 911 to help provide medical care for the dogs. A check will be presented to the organization at Thursday night’s Spikes game. Photo provided

A Radio Park Elementary School third-grader didn’t just find companionship in one dog; he found it with multiple hounds from Beagle 911, a Centre County-based refuge and rescue.

And in May, Nate Kopp helped spearhead an effort that raised $1,016 for the organization.

A check will be presented to Beagle 911 at Thursday night’s State College Spikes game during the third inning. Fans can take their dogs to the game as part of the evening’s “Bark in the Park” theme.

Nate’s mother, Lisa Kopp, said money will go toward medical care for the dogs.

Kopp said the initiative started last summer when she and Nate encountered a volunteer who was walking a group of beagles.

“She had a lot of beagles there and explained that she was volunteering for Beagle 911,” said Nate, 9. “I decided that I wanted to do that, too.”

Nate and his brother Chris, 12, met with Beagle 911 director Dick Shoemaker, who introduced the boys to the dogs and trained them on proper animal care. Four of Nate’s friends began helping in February.

They would take the dogs to the park on nice days (Nate’s favorite part of working with the group) and, during the winter, would bring them back to the Kopps’ home in State College.

“He’s been doing this every week during school, and the final fundraiser was a way to do something to contribute toward their care,” Kopp said.

In mid-May, a yard sale was held outside Wiscoy on West Aaron Drive, with donated items, Kopp said. Items that didn’t sell during the sale were advertised on Craigslist and eBay.

“They were really proud and excited to be part of something that helped the community,” Kopp said.

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