FILE - This Feb. 13, 2017, aerial file photo shows a site where the final phase of the Dakota Access Pipeline where it crosses beneath the Missouri River in North Dakota, just north of the Standing Rock Reservation in Emmons County in Cannon Ball, N.D. A federal judge is allowing four Native American tribes in the Dakotas to challenge the recent conclusion of federal officials that a Dakota Access oil pipeline spill wouldn't unfairly affect them, further prolonging a court case that has lingered for more than two years.
FILE - This Feb. 13, 2017, aerial file photo shows a site where the final phase of the Dakota Access Pipeline where it crosses beneath the Missouri River in North Dakota, just north of the Standing Rock Reservation in Emmons County in Cannon Ball, N.D. A federal judge is allowing four Native American tribes in the Dakotas to challenge the recent conclusion of federal officials that a Dakota Access oil pipeline spill wouldn't unfairly affect them, further prolonging a court case that has lingered for more than two years. The Bismarck Tribune via AP, File Tom Stromme
FILE - This Feb. 13, 2017, aerial file photo shows a site where the final phase of the Dakota Access Pipeline where it crosses beneath the Missouri River in North Dakota, just north of the Standing Rock Reservation in Emmons County in Cannon Ball, N.D. A federal judge is allowing four Native American tribes in the Dakotas to challenge the recent conclusion of federal officials that a Dakota Access oil pipeline spill wouldn't unfairly affect them, further prolonging a court case that has lingered for more than two years. The Bismarck Tribune via AP, File Tom Stromme