Kebby Johnson, center, of Spokane, Wash., holds a sign that reads "Say No to HB 1638," as she waits in line, Friday, Feb. 8, 2019, to attend a public hearing before the House Health Care & Wellness Committee at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash. Amid a measles outbreak that has sickened people in Washington state and Oregon, lawmakers heard public testimony Friday on a bill that would remove parents' ability to claim a philosophical exemption to opt their school-age children out of the combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine.
Kebby Johnson, center, of Spokane, Wash., holds a sign that reads "Say No to HB 1638," as she waits in line, Friday, Feb. 8, 2019, to attend a public hearing before the House Health Care & Wellness Committee at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash. Amid a measles outbreak that has sickened people in Washington state and Oregon, lawmakers heard public testimony Friday on a bill that would remove parents' ability to claim a philosophical exemption to opt their school-age children out of the combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine. Ted S. Warren AP Photo
Kebby Johnson, center, of Spokane, Wash., holds a sign that reads "Say No to HB 1638," as she waits in line, Friday, Feb. 8, 2019, to attend a public hearing before the House Health Care & Wellness Committee at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash. Amid a measles outbreak that has sickened people in Washington state and Oregon, lawmakers heard public testimony Friday on a bill that would remove parents' ability to claim a philosophical exemption to opt their school-age children out of the combined measles, mumps and rubella vaccine. Ted S. Warren AP Photo