Community

Local kindergartener grows locks for Wigs for Kids

Marie LeMay measures her son Zane’s hair at their home in Pennsylvania Furnace. Zane has been growing his hair out for two years and is planning to donate his locks to Wigs for Kids.
Marie LeMay measures her son Zane’s hair at their home in Pennsylvania Furnace. Zane has been growing his hair out for two years and is planning to donate his locks to Wigs for Kids. psheehan@centredaily.com

Most mornings, Zane LeMay wakes up with his hair a little tangled.

That’s why his mother, Marie LeMay, brushes it every morning.

About two years ago, Zane’s hair was about an inch long.

Now, the 5-year-old Easterly Parkway Elementary School kindergartener has more than 12 inches of wavy blond hair.

5-year-old Easterly Parkway student grows out hair to donate to Wigs for Kids

LeMay said the plan is to get her son’s hair cut in the spring and donate it to Wigs for Kids — an Ohio-based global organization that provides hair to children in need. The minimum length to donate to Wigs for Kids is 12 inches.

The idea to grow out Zane’s hair started when he was 3 years old.

“It started when I was too tired to cut his hair,” LeMay said with a laugh. “And it was just so beautiful I just let it keep growing and I had the idea that, ‘Man, I bet some little girl could just use that hair.’ It’s so pretty, I’d hate just throwing it out.”

And being good community stewards is something LeMay said she helps instill in her three children.

“It’s just what we do,” she said. “I always get my kids involved in research on (Penn State’s) campus, and my daughter (Jade) went with me to the Women’s March, and I try to keep them active and giving, so I thought it would be a good idea to get him (Zane) interest in growing it out.”

It wasn’t something Zane understood at first, but LeMay said several explanations helped him get the bigger picture.

My perspective for him is to get him started early because I think it’s never too early to get kids thinking about giving to others, and there’s always something someone can give, even a 5-year-old boy

Marie LeMay, Zane’s mother

“We just had to keep explaining it along the way, that someone can have his hair on their head,” LeMay said. “My perspective for him is to get him started early because I think it’s never too early to get kids thinking about giving to others, and there’s always something someone can give, even a 5-year-old boy.”

Whether to grow it out again, once he gets his hair cut, will be up to Zane.

“I look cooler when it’s short,” Zane said, but also added that he thinks it’s “cool” that someone can benefit from his hair.

Britney Milazzo: 814-231-4648, @M11azzo

  Comments