State College

Sister rally in State College shows support for Women’s March on Washington

People gather to support solidarity in State College

People rally at the Allen Street Gates in State College on Saturday to show support for solidarity in the wake of President Donald Trump's inauguration.
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People rally at the Allen Street Gates in State College on Saturday to show support for solidarity in the wake of President Donald Trump's inauguration.

The group of people rallying outside the Allen Street Gates on Saturday erupted into cheers whenever a vehicle drove past and honked its horn.

Most of those vehicles were honking in support of the Women’s March Sister Rally, being held in State College to show support for and solidarity with the other Women’s Marches taking place across the country in response to Friday’s inauguration of President Donald Trump.

“I don’t want to sit here and bash anything, but I am glad I live in the kind of country that allows us to do this,” participant Darleen Finocchio said. “I think the point is not to be against anything, but instead for something we feel doesn’t get the kind of attention it deserves.”

The rally attracted a couple hundred people holding signs and chanting slogans, including “Love trumps hate.”

But it wasn’t just women.

Donald Roy, of State College, said he attended the rally to “pay respect.”

“I respect women, unlike our president,” he said. “I was raised by a single mom, grew up with sisters and now have a wife and (two) daughters of my own. I want them to grow up in the kind of world where they are respected, and I want them to see that kind of role model in their dad.”

Louise Pettersson is from Sweden and was visiting a friend, Christina Pillot, of State College.

She attended the rally in support of Pillot, and said the election results don’t just affect Americans.

“It’s a global issue,” she said.

Pettersson said Sweden is ruled by Swedish Democrats, a nationalist political party, which supports Trump — not something she is in favor of.

“Everybody has equal rights to health care and to education, and working as a teacher in Sweden ... public education is the most important thing because with knowledge comes power,” she said.

But some believe there could be light at the end of the tunnel for those who feel oppressed and those rallying in support.

We feel positive about the future of our country, unlike our president, and we think there’s a lot of good we can do as long as we keep the common good in mind.

Christina Pillot

“We feel positive about the future of our country, unlike our president, and we think there’s a lot of good we can do as long as we keep the common good in mind,” Pillot said.

Pillot said her goals are to fight for public education, environmental protection and affordable health care.

Britney Milazzo: 814-231-4648, @M11azzo

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