Education

Student version of Shark Tank comes to Penns Valley classroom

Sixth-grade students Cedar Kimler and Justin Myers presented a project to their computer technology class. As part of class project called “Shark Tank,” students were asked to create a business or a product that would be presented to the class and three judges. They were judged based on the business presentation that included a logo, business card, slogan and commercial.
Sixth-grade students Cedar Kimler and Justin Myers presented a project to their computer technology class. As part of class project called “Shark Tank,” students were asked to create a business or a product that would be presented to the class and three judges. They were judged based on the business presentation that included a logo, business card, slogan and commercial. bmilazzo@centredaily.com

If a group of Penns Valley Elementary and Intermediate School sixth-grade students had their way, Centre County would be getting a new seafood restaurant, an action sports park, and a Penns Valley-based light company that would make it easier to see in the dark.

But it’s just a bunch of ideas three groups of students shared Wednesday morning as part of Jane Brooker’s computer technology class.

PVEI students participate in Shark Tank project

The project, called Shark Tank, was a concept similar to the ABC network show “Shark Tank.”

Students were required to create a business or project and present it to three judges. Their projects were required to include a logo, business card, slogan and commercial.

On Wednesday, the judges were Brooker, district athletic and communications director Nate Althouse, and life skills teacher Mary Fedor, who rated the ideas on a scale from one to five based on presentations.

And at least two of the ideas presented came as competition to other local businesses.

Students create businesses that would give Kelly’s Steak and Seafood, and Camp Woodward competition

Conner Kelly said he wanted to give his parents a “run for their money.”

They own Kelly’s Steak and Seafood, but Conner’s idea was to bring a similar seafood house to Penns Valley that would primarily specialize in crab and lobster dishes, but also offer a menu to include gluten-free and vegetarian meals.

He said it would also include a bigger variety of menu options, and at a lower cost than his family’s Boalsburg restaurant.

And the main mission, Conner said, was to bring fine dining — and seafood — to the Penns Valley area so residents wouldn’t have to drive as far.

Conner said an expected large turnover of guests should drive in enough money to pay employees and pay for fresh seafood provided by an outside vendor.

Classmates Cedar Kimler and Justin Myers presented an idea to open a business called C&J Parkour — a freestyle obstacle park similar to what Camp Woodward offers in Haines Township.

The catch, Justin said, is to bring the park to State College, which would attract more people, and offer services at a lower rate.

While Camp Woodward targets professional action-sport athletes looking to train, and amateur athletes looking to get training from professionals, Justin said he and Cedar’s park would target anyone from the public — no skill required.

And the last presentation came from a trio of girls — Rachel Breon, Deona Lauback and Kali Lucas — who made a nightlight-type lamp that doesn’t require an electrical outlet and would provide temporary light in the dark.

They provided the class and judges with a sample of their idea that included a glitter-filled mason jar with a glow stick it in.

The judges said they liked the idea, but were looking for more of a business plan behind the group’s work.

The project will continue next week, but with student judges who Brooker said can give a different perspective of feedback.

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