Penn State

Penn State football trainer with ties to Beta Theta Pi resigns

Attorneys call out Bream's responsibility for 'alcohol gauntlet'

Attorney for Beta Theta Pi fraternity member Joe Sala, Leonard Ambrose, calls out Penn State head athletic trainer Tim Bream and his involvement in the alcohol gauntlet that led to the death of fraternity pledge Timothy Piazza. Piazza family attor
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Attorney for Beta Theta Pi fraternity member Joe Sala, Leonard Ambrose, calls out Penn State head athletic trainer Tim Bream and his involvement in the alcohol gauntlet that led to the death of fraternity pledge Timothy Piazza. Piazza family attor

Tim Bream’s day job was keeping football players healthy. His night job was watching over a fraternity.

Bream is walking away from one of those jobs.

Penn State confirmed Friday that Bream has resigned from his position as the university’s assistant athletic director in charge of training and as Nittany Lion football head trainer.

“Tim Bream has notified us of his intention to resign his position, effective the end of this month. We appreciate Tim’s contributions to Penn State Athletics and his commitment to the care of our student-athletes and their success. We wish Tim success in his future endeavors,” spokesman Jeff Nelson said.

Bream was also the adviser at Beta Theta Pi, the fraternity banned a year ago following the death of Timothy Piazza, 19.

Beta Theta Pi and 26 members are charged with crimes connected with the pledge party where Piazza sustained fatal injuries, according to a grand jury report that detailed hazing and a 12-hour period where no one called for help.

Bream testified in a preliminary hearing on the case in August. He is not charged.

“No way would I give permission for an alcohol gauntlet, nor did I know about it,” he said at the time.

According to prosecutors, Piazza was made to consume 18 drinks in 82 minutes during the party.

In June, grieving parents Jim and Evelyn Piazza called for Bream to be fired.

“He lived in the fraternity house as their adviser and he was there the night of this pledge/hazing event. There is no way he didn’t know there was an illegal hazing event with alcohol going on and because he lived there for years, there is no way he didn’t know there was a history of illegal hazing and excessive drinking going on,” the Piazzas said in a statement. “He turned a blind eye for years. Had he reported this behavior, just once, our son’s life would have been saved.”

Tom Kline, the Piazzas’ attorney, said the family is pleased to see Bream gone from Penn State.

“They believe this should have happened a long time ago,” Kline said in a statement.

The Piazzas, who marked the anniversary of their son’s death less than a week ago, have called for more action from Penn State and accountability from those they believe could have prevented their loss.

In November, Bream was sued by one of his Beta alumni brothers, Donald Abbey. Abbey filed a suit against a number of board members, including Bream, alleging breach of fiduciary duty.

“In the last few years, the chapter and its active members began returning to their early 2000s ways of excessive alcohol consumption and engaging in alcohol-related hazing at the house. Most notably, (they) sought to do away with the house’s ‘dry’ status after it had been reconstituted,” Abbey’s attorney, Matthew Haverstick, wrote in a filing.

The Beta Theta Pi attorney did not return contacts for comment about Bream’s status with the Alpha Upsilon chapter.

Lori Falce: 814-235-3910, @LoriFalce

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