A chimney, the last remaining original structure from the days when survivors of the Clotilda, the last known slave ship brought into the United States, inhabited the area, stands in an abandoned lot in Africatown in Mobile, Ala., on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019. After years of watching the steady decline, descendants of the freed slaves who established Africatown are trying to create new ties and, perhaps, rebuild a community that’s in danger of fading away.
A chimney, the last remaining original structure from the days when survivors of the Clotilda, the last known slave ship brought into the United States, inhabited the area, stands in an abandoned lot in Africatown in Mobile, Ala., on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019. After years of watching the steady decline, descendants of the freed slaves who established Africatown are trying to create new ties and, perhaps, rebuild a community that’s in danger of fading away. Julie Bennett AP Photo
A chimney, the last remaining original structure from the days when survivors of the Clotilda, the last known slave ship brought into the United States, inhabited the area, stands in an abandoned lot in Africatown in Mobile, Ala., on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019. After years of watching the steady decline, descendants of the freed slaves who established Africatown are trying to create new ties and, perhaps, rebuild a community that’s in danger of fading away. Julie Bennett AP Photo