Good Life

Zipcar drives State College car sharing

Zipcar is available for Penn State students at at three residential communities.
Zipcar is available for Penn State students at at three residential communities. The Associated Press, file

Zipcar zooms in

Zipcar, a car sharing network, recently expanded to State College at three student apartment communities.

The Park, The Pointe and The Retreat residents and Penn State students can utilize the service.

Two vehicles are available at each apartment community, including a Honda Civic, a Ford Focus Hatchback and a Ford Focus Sedan. Residents and visitors, including students at the Penn State University, can access the Zipcars by becoming a member at zipcar.com.

The Zipcars have designated parking spots in each community, are available on-demand and can accessed 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Gas, insurance and up to 180 miles of driving per day are included in Zipcar rates, according to the company.

In addition to the six cars located at the apartment communities, members have access to five other vehicles in State College and Zipcar’s global fleet.

GIANT announces voluntary recall

A GIANT/MARTIN’s press release alerted customers to a voluntary recall of Zatarain’s red beans and rice.

One product, Zatarain’s red beans and rice original, 8 ounces, with a best by date of July 31, 2016, is a part of the recall.

The stores removed the product from its shelves because it may contain creamy Parmesan rice mix with dairy ingredients. Dairy allergens are not labeled on the red beans and rice package.

This product, according to the company, is safe to eat for people who do not have a dairy allergy. People who have a dairy allergy or severe sensitivity to dairy may have a life-threatening allergic reaction if they eat it. Customers who have purchased the product that want to return it “should discard any unused portions and bring their purchase receipt to GIANT/MARTIN’S for a full refund.”

We were always awake by 5 a.m., so my sister and I would send our little brother downstairs to see what Santa left under the tree and then made him give us a full report.

Lesley Kistner

Holiday traditions

Everyone celebrates holidays a little differently, but the basics usually stay the same.

The Grozniks of Groznik PR celebrated their first Christmas as State College homeowners this year.

“We’re looking forward to starting new holiday traditions like figuring out how to hang lights on our house in Park Forest or where to buy the best local Christmas tree,” Brad Groznik said.

Others, like Philipsburg Main Street Manager Dana Shoemaker, talked about their established Christmas traditions.

She said her family always had a Christmas Eve dinner before her dad read the story of Mary and Joseph and the birth of Jesus from the book of Luke. They then got to pick one gift, usually a toy or stuffed animal, to open.

“Although as kids we appreciated Santa Claus, for us he was not who bought the gifts,” she said. “Rather, Santa served as a holiday mascot for us. Now that we are adults the traditions have changed somewhat, but our love for tradition and the Christmas season continue on, and the food seems to be way more of what we get excited about rather than the gifts.”

Lesley Kistner, of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Centre County, recalled Christmas as a child.

“When my sister, brother and I were young, a Whitman’s Sampler was a Christmas Eve tradition,” she said. “It was probably the one time our parents didn’t care if we ate an entire box of chocolate at bedtime. Living in a small town in the early 1970s, it was a treat. We’d eat chocolate in our room and talk about all the things we hoped to get for Christmas.”

Art supplies and model horses were always on Kistner’s list, and they had to stay in bed until at least 6 a.m.

“We were always awake by 5 a.m., so my sister and I would send our little brother downstairs to see what Santa left under the tree and then made him give us a full report,” she said.

Shawn Annarelli: 814-235-3928, @Shawn_Annarelli

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