State College

Here’s what you need to know about overnight parking in State College

A view of a no parking between 2-6 a.m. sign in the Highlands neighborhood in downtown State College Thursday, Aug. 23, 2018.
A view of a no parking between 2-6 a.m. sign in the Highlands neighborhood in downtown State College Thursday, Aug. 23, 2018. psheehan@centredaily.com

After a bit of back and forth, overnight parking restrictions in State College seem to be settled.

On Monday, State College Borough Council voted, 5-2, to approve an amended ordinance on parking changes. Council President Evan Myers and Councilman Dan Murphy voted against it.

It’s different from the ordinance that council passed at the end of August, which was subsequently vetoed by Mayor Don Hahn. Council didn’t have the votes to override the veto, so the ordinance went to Transportation Commission for comment.

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Hahn said the new ordinance “seems like a really flexible system.”

It’s long been the tradition to allow overnight parking for special occasions, like Arts Fest and Penn State home football game weekends, where it’s posted “no parking 2-6 a.m.” This ordinance will allow for that to be waived during special events, which council will approve annually. The previous version of the ordinance spelled out what would be considered special events.

The ordinance also establishes the Highlands Residential Parking Permit Pilot Program, which will now go into effect Jan. 1, 2019 — rather than Oct. 1, as originally proposed.

Residents in the Highlands neighborhood will need to register for permits if they want to be able to park on streets there overnight. The previous version of the ordinance came with a $24 per year registration fee, which was struck from the new version of the ordinance.

Highlands residents will need to pay for overnight parking permits during special events, though.

The Highlands pilot program will end Aug. 15, 2020.

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