State College

Attorney: Jerry Sandusky still pushing for new trial

Jerry Sandusky will seek a new trial, lawyer says

Al Lindsay, Jerry Sandusky's lawyer, speaks on Feb. 25 at a press conference at The Country Inn & Suites in State College, where he proclaimed his client's innocence and said he'll seek a new trial.
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Al Lindsay, Jerry Sandusky's lawyer, speaks on Feb. 25 at a press conference at The Country Inn & Suites in State College, where he proclaimed his client's innocence and said he'll seek a new trial.

Jerry Sandusky will keep seeking a new trial, his attorney vowed Monday, using a press conference to criticize a former attorney for the convicted child molester.

About 30 people turned out for the mid-morning gathering at Country Inn & Suites on East College Avenue, where defense attorney Al Lindsay also tweaked a recent report from several Penn State board members.

The 109-page report signed by five current and two former alumni-elected trustees argues a university-funded investigation in 2012 was tainted by improper contacts with Penn State, the NCAA and state and federal law enforcement. Former FBI Director Louis Freeh led that investigation, which concluded that former football coach Joe Paterno and former university administrators Graham Spanier, Gary Schultz and Tim Curley covered up the Sandusky scandal to avoid bad publicity.

But according to Lindsay, the trustees’ report failed by accepting “as gospel that Jerry Sandusky actually did these things.” Sandusky, a former assistant football coach at Penn State, was sentenced in 2012 to 30 to 60 years in prison after a 45-count child molestation conviction.

A Pennsylvania Superior Court panel this month ordered him to be resentenced but struck down defense arguments for a new trial.

“Of course, it is our position from day one that Jerry Sandusky is absolutely innocent of the charges and was convicted of the various counts only by a very flawed criminal trial,” Lindsay wrote in a press release. He argued Joe Amendola, a former Sandusky attorney, was unprepared for trial, while witness Mike McQueary was the “Christmas tree upon which all the ornaments were hung.”

Amendola didn’t immediately respond to a request Monday for comment. McQueary, a former assistant football coach, became a focal point in the case for reporting he saw a boy in a Lasch Building shower with Sandusky.

Lindsay also said he was challenging the media to start a new narrative that the “whole doggone thing was preposterous,” in part because of Sandusky’s character and health issues.

“To be that type of a pedophile, you have to be a very conniving, secretive person,” Lindsay said. “Those of us that know Jerry well —the idea that he can keep anything secret is ridiculous. This guy is as open as you can possibly imagine.”

Lindsay said he plans to appeal to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court for a new trial. If he’s unsuccessful, he plans to pursue an appeal at the federal level, he said.

“I will predict this: Anybody who thinks that this thing can be suppressed and suppressed and that it’s going to go away, I have two words for you — dream on. This is not going to go away,” Lindsay said. “What happened in this case is horrible. It’s a blot on our legal system. And quite frankly, as a lawyer in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, when I look at what happened in this case, the only thing I can feel is shame.”

Sandusky, 75, is being held at the State Correctional Institution-Laurel Highlands in Somerset.

The Associated Press contributed

Bret Pallotto primarily reports on courts and crime for the Centre Daily Times. He grew up in Lewistown and graduated from Lock Haven University.
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