Crime

Clearfield County murder suspect complains about incarceration, treatment in jail

Clearfield County murder suspect Denny Bailey has filed multiple motions in his case, including issues with his incarceration. Bailey was charged with murder, along with Kenja Tew, in the 2017 death of Chase Anderson, 19, of Curwensville.
Clearfield County murder suspect Denny Bailey has filed multiple motions in his case, including issues with his incarceration. Bailey was charged with murder, along with Kenja Tew, in the 2017 death of Chase Anderson, 19, of Curwensville. Fresno Bee Staff Photo

A Woodland man charged with murder in the death of a Curwensville teen is taking issue with the conditions of his incarceration in county jail.

Denny Scott Bailey, 39, outlined those issues Thursday before Clearfield County President Judge Fredric J. Ammerman.

Bailey was charged in April 2018 with homicide in connection to the death of Chase Anderson, 19, who went missing in August 2017. Anderson’s burnt body was found in a wooded area of Pike Township. The Clearfield County coroner said he had suffered a broken nose, multiple stab wounds and a slit throat.

Both Bailey and Glen Richey man Kenja Kasheem Tew, 24, were charged with homicide in the case. While the men both said they fought with Anderson, each claimed the other stabbed him and burned the body.

Bailey’s attorneys have filed multiple pretrial motions in the case, including issues with Bailey’s incarceration, a change in venue for his trial, to sequester the jury, to bar prosecution from seeking the death penalty and to suppress some evidence.

Bailey took the stand Thursday to outline issues with his incarceration, particularly with his solitary confinement. Bailey has been in solitary confinement for most of his confinement since August 2017.

In his testimony, Bailey said that staying in isolation for so long was affecting him. He said he hears things and his thoughts are not his own.

“I don’t think I will ever recover,” he told Ammerman.

Bailey also claims he’s not getting his prescribed medicine, he’s not always receiving his monthly immune deficiency treatment, and that being handcuffed or shackled every time he leaves his cell makes it difficult to shower or exercise.

Countering Bailey’s claims, warden Greg Collins testified that keeping Bailey in isolation is a necessary security condition, citing a 2018 incident when Bailey fought with corrections officers, headbutting one of them. Collins also referenced examples of Bailey not listening to corrections officers, including throwing water on them.

Tew is also being kept in isolation, Collins said, as the other inmates know what the two men are accused of and have said they don’t want them on their cell blocks.

Bailey also claims he was coerced by Collins to tell police “the truth” by restricting his phone calls and visits shortly after he was first incarcerated.

State police Trooper David Patrick testified that during September through October 2017, Bailey did request to talk to police several times, and did he mention Collins’ alleged restrictions.

After the testimony, Bailey’s attorney Joe Ryan said the other motions are legal matters, and can be handled in briefs.

Ammerman gave the defense 45 days to complete these briefs. District Attorney William A. Shaw Jr. will then have 30 days to respond with his own briefs on the motions before Ammerman will make a ruling.

Bailey’s trial is scheduled for two weeks in October.

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