Penn State

Penn State welcomes SIMBA, addresses textbook issues on LionPATH

Penn State on Friday unveiled the System for Integrated Management, Budgeting and Accounting, otherwise known as SIMBA.
Penn State on Friday unveiled the System for Integrated Management, Budgeting and Accounting, otherwise known as SIMBA. Centre Daily Times, file

There’s a circle of life at Penn State as a new lion on campus is born, and an older one is acting up again.

On Thursday, the university made an announcement, revealing the name of the financial information system that will take the place of IBIS —the Integrated Business and Information System.

The new way of doing business is the System for Integrated Management, Budgeting and Accounting, which sounds very boring and numbers-y and not at all Penn State-ish (except for the fact that Pennsylvania’s land grant university is actually pretty well known for teaching business, logistics and information technology).

Like IBIS, though, the name it goes by will be an acronym, and it has a little more growl: SIMBA, which is also Swahili for the king of the beasts and the same name Disney gave to “The Lion King.”

“Reaching this milestone is an important part of any enterprise project process. We will continue to inform the university community as this project moves forward,” said Joe Doncsecz, Penn State’s corporate controller, in a statement.

The name has been picked, but the vendor will take another year to announce. The finished product is planned to “increase the university’s business agility through improved processes, reporting, budget forecasting and integrated functions, while at the same time introducing a contemporary user interface.”

But not long after Penn State announced that step, it had a hiccup with another system.

Students who want to find or buy their textbooks through LionPATH found the link malfunctioning.

LionPATH is the student information system that was unveiled in 2016. After decades of a previous system, Penn State replaced it with a fresh system that resulted in a rocky start.

The university said it is “working with Barnes & Noble to resolve the issue as soon as possible,” but that students can still buy books online through the bookseller’s online platform or via the Penn State Bookstore.

Classes at Penn State start Monday for the spring semester.

Lori Falce: 814-235-3910, @LoriFalce

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