Penn State

Tina Hay, Penn Stater magazine editor, to retire

Tina Hay, editor of The Penn Stater magazine for the past 22 years, announced July 18 that she will be leaving her role, effective Oct. 1, to begin a phased retirement from Penn State.
Tina Hay, editor of The Penn Stater magazine for the past 22 years, announced July 18 that she will be leaving her role, effective Oct. 1, to begin a phased retirement from Penn State.

Tina Hay, longtime editor of The Penn Stater magazine, is stepping down.

Hay, who has served in the role for the past 22 years, announced Wednesday that she’ll be leaving her position effective Oct. 1 to begin a phased retirement from Penn State, according to a university press release.

The Penn Stater, a bimonthly magazine, is a benefit of membership in the Penn State Alumni Association, which has more than 173,000 dues-paying members.

“For many Penn Staters, Tina Hay has been their connection to ‘Dear Old State’ through her storytelling in The Penn Stater magazine,” Paul Clifford, CEO of the Alumni Association, said in the release. “Her honesty, wit, charm and tact have served as beacons to her team and moved alumni to action and emotion. Any list of the most influential collegiate magazine editors has to include Tina Hay near or at the very top. For the better part of the last quarter-century, we’ve been grateful to have her as part of the Penn State Alumni Association team.”

With Hay at the helm, The Penn Stater earned more than 200 national awards, including the 2007 Robert Sibley Magazine of the Year Award. The magazine’s “unflinching” coverage of the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal earned more than two dozen national honors, including the Public Relations Society of America’s top award, according to the press release.

In its 100-year-plus history, The Penn Stater has only had a half-dozen editors. Hay said in the release that “it’s a privilege to serve in the role. I’m really grateful for the creative talent and hard work of the magazine staff, and the administrative support, that enable us produce a high-quality magazine for our readers, issue after issue.”

She continued: “Still, 22 years is a long time to stay in the same job, and I’m eager to explore some other possibilities and passions before my working career is over.”

Hay will serve as an editor-at-large at The Penn Stater during her phased retirement, the release said. She’ll assist with planning and developing feature stories and create a more “robust” digital presence for the magazine.

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