Jerry Sandusky Scandal

Order sets rules for McQueary jury selection, trial

Former Penn State football assistant coach Mike McQueary is suing the university, claiming he suffered for his part in the grand jury investigation and trial of retired Nittany Lions defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky. Jury selection in the case is set to start at 8:30 a.m. Monday.
Former Penn State football assistant coach Mike McQueary is suing the university, claiming he suffered for his part in the grand jury investigation and trial of retired Nittany Lions defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky. Jury selection in the case is set to start at 8:30 a.m. Monday. Centre Daily Times, file

The next steps in Mike McQueary’s whistleblower lawsuit will actually take him into a courtroom.

Four years and four days after the former Penn State football assistant coach filed his suit against the university, Chester County Senior Judge Thomas Gavin, specially presiding in the case, signed an order Thursday setting the case on the road to conclusion.

McQueary is suing the university, claiming he suffered for his part in the grand jury investigation and trial of retired Nittany Lions defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky.

McQueary became a lightning rod for his part in the criminal case after charges were filed in 2011 and the story of McQueary seeing a young boy in a university locker room shower with Sandusky became public knowledge.

Gavin set jury selection in the case to start at 8:30 a.m. Monday. Trial was set for Oct. 17.

Gavin’s latest order addresses procedures for the public and media for those upcoming dates. It is more restrictive than those of some other judges in Sandusky-related cases.

McKean County Senior Judge John Cleland, for example, presided over Sandusky’s criminal trial and has continued to sit in proceedings for his appeals, including three recent days of evidentiary hearings for a Post-Conviction Collateral Relief Act petition. In that case, media has been allowed cellphones, computers and devices and sections of the courtroom have been reserved.

That will not happen in McQueary’s case. The media has also been specifically barred from interviews inside and out of the courthouse and annex, except where Sheriff Bryan Sampsel sets up a podium.

The public is also banned from bringing cellphones or other devices into the courtroom.

Lori Falce: 814-235-3910, @LoriFalce

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