Pennsylvania

Measles outbreak hits 21 states, including Pennsylvania

Getting vaccinated can help stop measles from spreading

Since measles is still common in many countries, unvaccinated travelers bring measles to the U.S. and it can spread. But you can protect yourself, your family, and your community with the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine.
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Since measles is still common in many countries, unvaccinated travelers bring measles to the U.S. and it can spread. But you can protect yourself, your family, and your community with the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine.

More than 100 people in 21 states, including Pennsylvania, were reported to have measles this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported.

The reports date between Jan. 1 to July 14, the CDC said, noting that the majority of people who get measles are unvaccinated. The 107 reported cases stretch across the country, and include reports from Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington and the District of Colombia.

Last year, the CDC reported a total of 118 cases from 15 states and the District of Columbia, up from the previous count of 86 cases in 2016. The U.S. experienced a record number of cases in 2014, with 667 reports across 27 states — the greatest number of cases since the documented elimination of the disease in the U.S. in 2000, the CDC said.

Measles is still common in many parts of the world including countries in Europe, Asia, the Pacific and Africa, the CDC said. Travelers with measles continue to bring it into the U.S., where it can spread when it reaches a community where groups of people are unvaccinated.

Symptoms generally appear about a week to two weeks after a person is infected, the CDC said, and begins with a high fever, cough, runny nose and red, watery eyes. Three to five days after symptoms appear, a rash breaks out, appearing on the face and spreading downward to the rest of the body.

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