Letters to the Editor

Look at Freeh’s record

More than 15 years ago, an employee brought evidence of child sexual abuse to the attention of superiors. The most powerful people in the organization ignored the employee’s concerns, and also retaliated against the employee. They endangered other children by not interviewing the victim even though he might have had information about other victims.

Louis Freeh was FBI director when the law enforcement professional in question, Jane Turner, brought her concerns to him and other superiors. The incident involved the forcible rape of 9-year-old boy at the Turtle Mountain reservation in Minot, N.D. Other FBI personnel wrote off the boy’s injuries to an “auto accident” to avoid having to investigate a crime outside the FBI’s usual purview. A court later found that Turner’s superiors had retaliated against her, and awarded her damages.

Penn State’s trustees, including current Chair Ira Lubert, Vice Chair Mark Dambly and Homecoming Marshal Joel Myers, knew Freeh’s record when they hired him to investigate Penn State because Turner’s attorney at the National Whistleblowers Center informed them and President Rodney Erickson in writing in November 2011.

They nonetheless permitted Freeh to write a report that best described his own performance at the FBI rather than anything at Penn State, and then failed to review or challenge the findings in question. This tells us everything we need to know about the Freeh report and the diligence of the trustees who allowed it to cause so much harm to Penn State.

William A. Levinson, Wilkes Barre

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